Alpha Phi Omega
National Service Fraternity

Region III
Sections 79,80,81,83,84

Advisor's Resource Guide

September 1998
PREFACE

Dear Advisor:

 

The purpose of this guide is to serve as a resource for the "new advisors on the block" as well as the "seasoned pros" who have served as chapter advisors over a period of time. Your position as an advisor is ever changing just as the chapter you serve and the fraternity itself is ever changing.

The role you play as an advisor is very important to the survival of the chapter you serve. Your expertise, knowledge and stability are one of the reasons Alpha Phi Omega is thriving. You impact the lives of students within your chapter, which in turn feeds into the impact they make with their educational institution, youth and community, and to the nation as they perform service and become the leaders of tomorrow.

Please take time to review the enclosed materials that have been prepared especially for you. Thank you for the work you do. It is highly valued and appreciated.

In Leadership, Friendship, and Service,

Region III Staff


This guide was written by Linda Prevatte with editing by Michael Leahy. Reviewers of the guide include: Jamie Conover, Lee Correll, Steven Crawford, Ray Hancock, Ruth Hancock, Wilfred Krenick, Jeff Thomas, and Diane Trafton. This is a Region III publication and should not be considered an official publication of Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity. Inquiries regarding Alpha Phi Omega and its official publications and policies may be directed to: Alpha Phi Omega, 14901 East 42nd Street, Independence, MO, 64055-7347.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION I - OVERVIEW OF ALPHA PHI OMEGA

  1. What is Alpha Phi Omega?
  2. History
  3. Today

SECTION II - ADVISORS AND THE CHAPTERS THEY SERVE

  1. Types of Membership in Alpha Phi Omega
  2. National Requirements for Chapter Advisors
  3. Types of Chapter Advisors
  4. Chapter Recognition
  5. Chapter Organization and Operations
  6. Role and Responsibilities of Chapter Advisors and the Advisory Committee
  7. A Word of Caution for Chapter Advisors
  8. Chapter and Advisor Liability Issues

SECTION III - ALPHA PHI OMEGA NATIONAL STRUCTURE

  1. Section
  2. Region
  3. National

APPENDIX A - ALPHA PHI OMEGA REFERENCE MATERIALS

Alpha Phi Omega Terms and Acronyms
Section E-Mail Discussion Listserves/Web Pages
Region III Web Page
Region III Advisor's Resource Guide Web Page
Region III Staff List
Alpha Phi Omega National E-Mail Discussion Listserve
Alpha Phi Omega National Web Page
Alpha Phi Omega National Office Contact Information
Advisor's Resource Guide Feedback
Alpha Phi Omega National Bylaws and S tandard Chapter Articles of Association
Alpha Phi Omega National Pledge Manual
National Membership Policies
National Pledging Standards
National Risk Management Policy

APPENDIX B - CHAPTER RESOURCES (To Be Provided By The Chapter You Advise)
Chapter Bylaws/Standing Policy
Chapter Roster
Chapter Handbook/Operations Manual
Chapter Calendar of Events
Chapter Newsletter
Chapter Business Meeting Minutes/Executive Committee Meeting Minutes


SECTION I

OVERVIEW OF ALPHA PHI OMEGA

 

1. What is Alpha Phi Omega?

Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity is an international coeducational service fraternity founded on the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service. Alpha Phi Omega (APO) provides its membership the opportunity to develop leadership skills as they provide service to their campus, to youth and the community, to the nation, and to members of the fraternity. The basis of the fraternity's brotherhood comes from a foundation of shared beliefs, experiences, and an understanding of our fraternal history and goals.

 

2. History

The fraternity came into existence on December 16, 1925, at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. The fraternity was founded on the ideals and principles of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) and was created as a means for men to continue scouting and build upon those principles during their college career. BSA membership was a requirement to join APO until 1967.

In 1976, the national fraternity acknowledged the importance of brotherhood among all people by admitting women into the fraternity as full members. Since 1976, wording in fraternity rituals has been interpreted to include all members of Alpha Phi Omega regardless of gender.

The founding brothers envisioned a fraternity that would dedicate itself to leadership development and world peace while providing service. It was their hope that the organization would spread to educational institutions throughout the world. Their vision became a reality when the International Council of Alpha Phi Omega was formed December 28, 1994, in Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas. The council is composed of Alpha Phi Omega of the United States of America and Alpha Phi Omega of the Republic of the Philippines.

 

3. Today

Alpha Phi Omega is the single most representative intercollegiate service organization in the United States and is the only international fraternity devoted to service. More than 300,000 students have become brothers since 1925 in the United States. Over half of the currently active brothers are women.

The fraternity has expanded its traditional ties with BSA to work with other youth oriented organizations such as the Girl Scouts of the United States of America, 4-H clubs, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, and YMCA/YWCA.

There are thirty-five active chapters in Region III that consists of Section 79 and Section 80 in North Carolina, Section 81 and Section 83 in Virginia, and Section 84 in the District of Columbia and Maryland. There are more than 330 active chapters in the United States and more than 200 chapters in the Republic of the Philippines. The International Council has efforts underway to start chapters in Canada and Australia.


SECTION II

ADVISORS AND THE CHAPTERS THEY SERVE

1. Types of Membership in Alpha Phi Omega

The national fraternity has established various types of membership in APO. Chapters may have additional membership types to address specific needs. Understanding how membership categories relate to the hierarchy of the chapter and its operations is important for advisors.

Advisor

An advisor is someone who has been voted by a chapter to serve on their Advisory Committee. Advisors are members of the chapter and fraternity and have all the rights and privileges of active membership except: 1) voting; 2) directing the fellowship, service, membership or pledge programs; 3) serving as a Big Brother to a pledge; and 4) holding office in the chapter, other than Chair of the Advisory Committee. Advisors not only have the right but are encouraged to attend any APO chapter events whether or not they have an APO background. New advisors receive a certificate and membership card from the National Office and should be inducted into the fraternity through the Initiation Ritual and given a service lapel pin by the chapter they have been asked to serve.

Pledge

A pledge is an enrolled student at an educational institution where an APO chapter is located who is selected by the chapter to participate in a 6-10 week period of preparation and training in the ideals and purposes of Alpha Phi Omega, meet the members of the chapter, and learn about chapter history and operations.

Active

An active is an enrolled student at an educational institution where an APO chapter is located who has been initiated as an APO brother through the Initiation Ritual and meets all of the chapter's active membership requirements. Active requirements may include attending chapter meetings, paying chapter dues, participating in service projects or performing a specific number of service hours, and serving on a committee such as service or membership. Certain privileges are afforded active brothers such as voting, serving as a Big Brother to a pledge, and running for office within the chapter.

Associate

Associate status is assigned to an active brother who finds it necessary to cease full involvement with the chapter, because of other time commitments (work, school, etc.), and who petitions the chapter for associate membership. Typically, associate membership limits the brother's rights in chapter activities such as holding an elected position in the chapter.

Petitioner

A petitioner is an enrolled student at an educational institution where a Petitioning Group of Alpha Phi Omega is located who is selected by the Petitioning Group to participate in the establishment of an APO chapter.

Honorary

Honorary status is given to a person who has contributed significantly to the ideals and purposes of Alpha Phi Omega. Honorary members have the same rights and privileges as advisory members. The chapter must approve the selection of honorary members by a three-fourths vote of the chapter's active membership. This type of membership is not given to undergraduates of schools with APO chapters.

Alumni

Alumni status is assigned to active, advisory or honorary members who leave a chapter (graduate, transfer to another educational institution, stop taking classes, stop serving as an advisor) without being suspended or expelled from the chapter. Alumni should not participate or interfere in the day-to-day operations of a chapter and have no official role within the chapter.

Life Member

Life Member status is given to members who contribute to the Alpha Phi Omega Endowment Fund ($50.00 for students and those graduating in the previous year and $75.00 for all other members). Active brothers must continue to pay Annual Active Membership Dues through their chapter to the national fraternity. Life members receive a free lifetime subscription to the quarterly fraternity magazine, Torch & Trefoil (renewable at no cost every five years); a certificate; membership card; and life member lapel pin from the National Office.

 

P>2. National Requirements for Chapter Advisors

A chapter is required by Alpha Phi Omega National Bylaws and Standard Chapter Articles of Association to have an Advisory Committee consisting of three or more advisors from the faculty, staff or administration of the educational institution where the chapter is located; one or more scouting/youth advisors; and any other advisors deemed necessary. Undergraduates may not serve as chapter advisors.

3. Types of Chapter Advisors

Advisors serve as a valuable liaison and advocate for the chapter with the educational institution where the chapter is located, the community, scouting/youth organizations, and the national fraternity. The following are advisor categories recognized by Alpha Phi Omega.

Faculty/Staff Advisors - An advisor employed by the educational institution where an APO chapter is located as a faculty member, campus official, or staff member. As policies, procedures and politics change, these advisors can be an invaluable on-campus resource to the chapter in keeping current on the happenings of the institution. The institution may require that one faculty/staff member be designated as an official liaison to the chapter.

Scouting/Youth Advisor - An advisor who works with a scouting or youth organization. This advisor should encourage chapter participation in scouting and with youth in the community through the Boy Scouts of America, the Girl Scouts of the United States of America, 4-H clubs, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, YMCA/YWCA, community recreation programs, tutoring, etc.

Community Advisor - An advisor who works for a community service, volunteer or civic organization or an APO alumnus who lives near the chapter. This advisor typically has numerous community connections or insight that serves the needs of a chapter.

Chair of the Advisory Committee - An advisor elected by the chapter to oversee the Advisory Committee and concurrently serve as an officer on the chapter's Executive Committee. This is the only elected officer position within a chapter an advisor may hold.

 

4. Chapter Recognition

Chapters exist because they have been officially recognized by (1) the educational institution where the chapter is located and (2) the organization of Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity. Both of these organizations jointly hold the chapter's charter.

The students of the chapter must be registered at the educational institution where the APO chapter is located and must abide by the policies and regulations of the institution. To remain in good standing with the institution, there are often additional requirements a chapter must fulfill on a semester or annual basis, including filling out paperwork and participating in informational or leadership sessions.

The chapter remains in good standing with Alpha Phi Omega by adhering to the national bylaws and fulfilling all reporting and financial obligations in a timely fashion. Reporting and financial obligations include:

  • Meeting the national requirements for chapter advisors
  • Prompt payment of bills to the APO National Office
  • Paperwork and payment of dues forwarded to the APO National Office within ten days of the Pledge Ritual and Initiation Ritual
  • Completion of the Chapter Reaffirmation Packet

The Chapter Reaffirmation packet includes:

  • A roster of the chapter's members, including advisors
  • Payment of Annual Active Membership Dues (AAMD) per active brother
  • Signed reaffirmation of Standard Chapter Articles of Association
  • Signed adherence to the APO National Risk Management Policy

The Chapter President and Chair of the Advisory Committee must sign the packet and submit it to the APO National Office by November 15 each year. Since chapters all over the United States have the same deadline, chapters are strongly encouraged to prepare their paperwork and mail payment to the National Office by November 1. Advisors should encourage the chapter's leadership to take care of this obligation every November.

Chapters who do not fulfill their reporting and financial obligations are not in compliance and therefore are not considered in good standing with the fraternity. Chapters not in good standing are not allowed to vote at sectional, regional and national business meetings and legislative sessions. After two years of nonpayment, the national fraternity may declare a chapter inactive.

 

5. Chapter Organization and Operations

Each chapter, operating under Alpha Phi Omega National Bylaws and Standard Chapter Articles of Association, recruits its own membership, selects its leadership, develops its own service and fellowship programs, and establishes its own set of standard operating procedures known as Chapter Bylaws and Standing Policies.

Chapter Meetings

Chapter meetings are held either weekly or biweekly during the academic year to plan service and fellowship projects, vote on business, share information, and encourage interaction among members.

Executive Committee

Each chapter elects its own officers who comprise the Executive Committee. A typical Executive Committee includes: a President, Service Vice President, Membership Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Chair of the Advisory Committee. Other officers or appointed positions may include: Leadership Vice President, Fellowship Vice President a.k.a. Friendship Vice President or Social Vice President, Pledge Trainer a.k.a. Pledge Educator or Pledge Master, Sergeant-at-Arms, Historian, Recording/Corresponding Secretary, Alumni Secretary, Rush Chair, and Interchapter Liaison.

Executive Committee Meetings

Executive Committee meetings supplement chapter meetings and are used by chapter leaders to plan and coordinate activities, vote on business, review chapter programs, determine chapter meeting issues and agenda items, brainstorm, and settle disputes.

Advisory Committee

Chapter advisors, all voted on by the chapter, and the Chapter President comprise the Advisory Committee. One advisor, elected by the chapter, serves as the Chair of the Advisory Committee. The Chair acts as a liaison between the Executive Committee and the Advisory Committee. The Advisory Committee should meet once a semester at minimum.

Pledge Program

The 6-10 week pledge program begins with the Pledge Ritual and ends with the Initiation Ritual, both official ceremonies of the national fraternity. Within ten days of both of these ceremonies, the chapter is expected to register and pay dues to National Office for these members.

Each chapter determines its own pledge program within the guidelines of APO National Pledging Standards and APO Membership Policies. The pledge program should teach pledges about APO principles and national history and chapter history and operations. This program gives pledges and the chapter a trial period during which the chapter determines if the pledges should become brothers and the pledges decide if they want to become active brothers committed to the principles of APO.

Pledge requirements are typically patterned after the requirements of active brothers in the chapter. This provides pledges with an opportunity to determine if they want the responsibility of active membership. Requirements may include a certain number of service hours or projects; attending pledge meetings; taking quizzes; wearing a pledge pin; planning a service project, fellowship event, and fundraiser; and getting signatures and/or interviews from members of the chapter, including advisors.

Chapter Communication

Chapters must maintain a post office box or other permanent chapter mailing address. Many chapters maintain a campus office, a bulletin board, a chapter file, and/or a sign-in book. Other methods of communication chapters use to reach their membership include: a voice mail system, phone tree, E-mail distribution list, web page, newsletter, chapter calendar of events, meeting minutes, and chapter roster.

 

6. Role and Responsibilities of Chapter Advisors and the Advisory Committee

Advisors offer life knowledge, continuity, and stability to a chapter whose membership and leadership will typically change every two years. They provide an objective, long-term perspective and a historical perspective of the chapter, the educational institution where the chapter is located, and Alpha Phi Omega.

Every chapter and each advisor within the chapter must determine the level of involvement of the advisor. An advisor's role with the chapter will depend upon the chapter's needs, the advisor's background and expertise, and the commitment level of the advisor. Some chapters set up advisor guidelines or have advisor contracts with their Advisory Committee so that expectations of both the chapter and the Advisory Committee are clearly communicated.

Advisors should serve a one or two year term of office, renewable at the end of the term. This allows both the advisor and the chapter to evaluate the working relationship and make necessary changes. The Advisory Committee and the chapter should jointly set the term of office and it is recommended that the terms be staggered so that all of the advisors are not up for renewal at the same time. This will promote a stable Advisory Committee.

Each advisor should have a specific role within the chapter. This role can change over time but the idea is to match the talents of the Advisory Committee with the needs of the chapter. Advisors may serve as a resource on special committees such as bylaws, conference, or anniversary. Many chapters pair each advisor on the Advisory Committee with one of the chapter leaders on the Executive Committee. This enables advisors to build a one-on-one relationship with a chapter leader and takes part of the load off the Chair of the Advisory Committee who works with the entire Executive Committee. The advisor and officer can determine the level of involvement with one another. A monthly E-mail or phone call can serve as a reminder to the student leader that the advisor is available as a resource if needed. Having lunch or dinner together may also be a productive way to mentor the chapter leader.

The Advisory Committee and Executive Committee should meet every semester to communicate expectations and prioritize important upcoming chapter events. Involvement by advisors in the following chapter activities is strongly encouraged: chapter meetings; service projects; fellowship events; and pledge service project, fellowship event or fundraiser.

The Advisory Committee should make every effort to attend the following:

  • Advisory Committee meetings
  • Chapter ceremonies
  • Chapter banquets/semiformals/formals
  • Chapter Program Planning Conference

Attendance at chapter activities is key to establishing a working relationship with chapter members and staying current with chapter happenings. Students tend to talk with and seek counsel from advisors who are familiar to them. Rotating attendance at chapter meetings and activities by the Advisory Committee is one way advisors can work together to best meet the needs of the chapter.

If an advisor finds it difficult to attend chapter functions, an active brother in the chapter should be assigned to stay in regular contact and keep the advisor up-to-date. Communicating reasons for lack of attendance at events will give the students a better sense of an advisor's life and outside obligations and assures the students that the advisor is still interested in serving the chapter, even if the advisor cannot always be "seen."

If communication between the chapter and/or the Executive Committee and the Advisory Committee wanes, advisors may need to initiate contact with chapter leadership. As transitions occur in the chapter's leadership and membership, advisors may become lost in the mix. An active Advisory Committee should prevent this from happening.

Advisors should be accessible to the chapter with an open door, open phone, and open E-mail policy as they may be asked to discuss chapter issues, provide guidance to students with personal or academic concerns, or serve as a mediator as conflicts arise among members of the chapter.

Chapter officers often ask advisors to serve as a sounding board regarding chapter operations or important chapter decisions. Advisors should encourage student leaders to explore all of their options and then let the students led the chapter in the direction they decide is best. Advisors may find it useful to play a "devil's advocate" role with the chapter leadership when important decisions are being made. This forces the students to think through decisions and explore all sides of the situation before taking action.

Advisors are expected to respect the chapter's decisions even if they are not always in agreement. It is important for advisors to allow the chapter and the student leaders to learn by trial and error and make mistakes, unless the chapter is violating Alpha Phi Omega National Bylaws and Standard Chapter Articles of Association, APO Membership Policies, or APO National Risk Management Policies. It is the responsibility of advisors to point out violations to the chapter leaders and, if necessary, take appropriate action. Advisors may find it necessary to advocate for pledges and members of the chapter and uphold the policies of APO or the educational institution where the chapter is located.

Advisors should monitor the chapter for potential problems (apathy, declining membership or participation in projects, too many seniors/not enough freshman, inadequate planning, etc.) and counsel the leadership on options to correct the situation. Monitoring new members is also important to assess their ability to assume responsibility and take on new leadership skills. A word of encouragement for a new brother or a pat on the back for the brother that ran for an office and lost can go a long way to inspire these students to face new challenges and continue to be a part of the chapter and its operations.

Advisors should encourage chapter pride and awareness of chapter history. At the same time, a chapter must be allowed to evolve and not act as a carbon copy of a chapter that existed a year ago, five years ago, etc., or as a copy of other chapters. The chapter must be allowed to express itself as it is and not as a by-product of the past. A healthy chapter is willing to try new fellowship or service projects and/or change chapter operations when necessary. Allowing a chapter to undergo change and experience growing pains is important.

It is not uncommon for students to ask advisors with whom they have established a working relationship to serve as a reference or provide letters of recommendations for part-time jobs, summer jobs, full-time employment upon graduation or graduate school admission applications. Advisors may also be able to assist students by providing networking opportunities.

 

7. A Word of Caution for Chapter Advisors

Being an advisor is a serious responsibility. It is incumbent upon advisors to serve the students and their best interests at all times. Keeping this in mind may help advisors determine what activities within the chapter are and are not appropriate. Below are some common "traps" advisors should avoid.

Telling the chapter what to do; dictating policy changes; running meetings; organizing or running service, membership or fellowship programs; and providing too many answers or too much direction.

Students should be given every opportunity to develop their leadership skills by running the chapter. It is the responsibility of students to fulfill the purpose of Alpha Phi Omega, not advisors.

Getting involved in chapter politics, cliques or social circles; dating students in the chapter; and partying and/or drinking with students.

Advisors may be perceived as having lost objectivity or favoring one group of students over another. Participation in these activities can also lead to a loss of respect by members within the chapter for the advisor. Once an advisor loses credibility, it may never be regained.

Living in the past, "when I was a brother/when I was a student/at my chapter"; being pessimistic; and being arrogant.

The students should be allowed to express their originality and creativity and to try varying leadership techniques through their service, membership, and fellowship programs. Advisors who live in the past and/or have a poor attitude may prevent a chapter from moving forward which can ultimately lead to its demise.

Advisors have a necessary supporting role but should not play a dominating role in the chapter. It is counterproductive and can lead to misunderstandings and unnecessary conflict within the chapter.

 

8. Chapter and Advisor Liability Issues

Alpha Phi Omega has national membership, pledging, and risk management policies to protect the national organization and its members and to address potential liability issues facing chapters. Every APO member should be familiar with and uphold these policies outlined below and provided in full in the Alpha Phi Omega National Pledge Manual.

Alpha Phi Omega National Alcohol Policy

"Chapters, petitioning groups and interest groups of Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity shall not use or condone the use of alcoholic beverages as part of the membership recruitment "rush" or pledge education programs. A violation of this policy shall be deemed a violation of the membership policies of Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity."

Region III Interpretation of the National Alcohol Policy

Alcohol is prohibited at any event where pledges are completing pledging requirements. This shall include pledge book signings, wearing of pledge pins/badges, service projects, fellowship events, pledge retreats, etc. This applies to everyone regardless of age.

Alpha Phi Omega National Hazing Policy

"Alpha Phi Omega does not tolerate any hazing or informal initiation. The pledge program should not demean or require individuals to perform personal service for members of the chapters. APO does not tolerate unofficial ceremonies."

Region III Rule of Thumb: Would you hesitate to put your mother or minister/priest/rabbi through this activity? If so, it is probably hazing. If you have to rationalize the activity, it is probably hazing.

Alpha Phi Omega National Risk Management Policy

The Risk Management Policy covers the following areas: hazing, contractual and financial issues, sexual harassment/abuse/discrimination, alcohol and drugs (substance abuse), personal property, transportation issues, general health and safety, advisors, and education. The policy says the following about advisors:

"Advisors and alumni serving Alpha Phi Omega on behalf of their employer or respective volunteer agency (educational institution, youth service organization, etc.) will do so in accordance with the policies of said entity, including but not limited to risk management and personal liability. Advisors and alumni shall adhere to the provisions of this and all applicable policies of the fraternity when engaging in fraternity-related activities. Advisors and alumni shall recognize the appropriate authority of elected or appointed officers, representatives or employees of the fraternity in question of policy, and shall not engage in activities designed to circumvent fraternity policies."

Alpha Phi Omega members must abide by the laws of the nation, the laws of the state in which they reside, the local laws of the municipalities they operate within, the rules and regulations of the educational institute they operate in, and the rules and regulations of this fraternity. As a general rule, advisors should ask two questions when there is a concern about liability and safety at chapter events: 1) Is it possible given the arrangements made for this event, some injury may result? and 2) Has everything appropriate been done to avoid accidents?


SECTION III

ALPHA PHI OMEGA NATIONAL STRUCTURE

Alpha Phi Omega is organized at four levels:

  1. Chapter
  2. Section
  3. Region
  4. National

 

1. Section

Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity has divided the United States into sections based upon a specific geographic location. Chapters belong in a section composed of an average of

5-10 other APO chapters in the area or state. The section exists to provide chapters with the opportunity to share their experiences and to create a bond of fellowship and brotherhood beyond the chapter level.

Sectional Chair

The section is administered by a Sectional Chair who has been elected by the chapters within the section for a one-year term. The Sectional Chair oversees sectional operations and acts as a liaison between chapters and the national fraternity. Responsibilities include: helping and guiding chapters in developing their leadership, membership, fellowship, and service programs; and coordinating a section conference, as well as multi-chapter leadership, membership, fellowship, and service events within the section.

Sectional Staff

The Sectional Chair may appoint staff to assist in the administration of the section. Staff members serve as a fraternity resource and provide passive guidance to APO chapters. They are responsible for assisting the Sectional Chair in promoting programs and activities. Positions on staff, defined by the Sectional Chair, include Chapter Representatives and may include coordinators of areas such as communication, service, alumni, membership, awards, and conference committee.

Chapter Representatives are appointed by the Sectional Chair and approved by the chapter(s) they are assigned. Chapter Representatives provide chapters with information regarding section events and provide chapter status reports to the Sectional Chair on a regular basis. Since Chapter Representatives are not members of the chapter, they should not interfere with chapter operations or assume the role of a permanent, unofficial chapter advisor. Chapters have the right to ask for a different Chapter Representative if they deem it necessary.

Sectional Conference

A Sectional Conference is held on an annual basis. At these conferences, students and advisors from chapters throughout the section gather with alumni and staff to participate in leadership development seminars, workshops, service projects, and fellowship activities. A business meeting is held during the conference to consider section business, elect a Sectional Chair, and select a site for the next Sectional Conference. Each chapter is expected to send two voting delegates to the conference to represent their chapter during this meeting.

One chapter within the section is selected by the voting delegates to host the next conference. The Sectional Chair and the host chapter will work together over a nine-month period to organize the conference. Typically, one or two active brothers within the host chapter will be elected by the host chapter to serve as Conference Coordinator(s). A conference committee may be utilized in order to accomplish the various tasks associated with organizing the conference. Generally 100-200 members will attend. Advisors are strongly encouraged to attend.

Section Events

The section may sponsor service projects, membership or leadership workshops, and fellowship events. These events supplement Sectional Conferences and provide additional opportunities for students to enhance leadership skills as well as network and bond with other chapters in the section.

 

2. Region

Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity has divided the United States into ten regions based upon a specific geographic location. Chapters belong in a region composed of an average of 25-50 chapters.

Regional Director

The region is administered by a Regional Director who has been elected by the chapters within the region for a two-year term. The Regional Director is a member of the National Board of Directors of Alpha Phi Omega, the administrative officer of the region, and has fiduciary and legal responsibility for the actions of members and chapters within the region. Responsibilities include: serving as a liaison between chapters in the region and the national fraternity; providing leadership to the region; ensuring chapters are adhering to APO national policies; and monitoring and communicating membership trends, problems, and concerns to the National Board of Directors.

Regional Staff

The Regional Director has a staff consisting of the Sectional Chairs within the region. They work with each other to stay informed of the happenings of the region. For administrative purposes, the Regional Director may appoint additional regional staff. The Regional Director defines their duties as needed by the region which may include areas such as alumni, membership, extension efforts, parliamentary procedure, service, and leadership. These individuals may work with section staff and/or APO National Program Directors and their committees.

Regional Conference

A Regional Conference is held in odd-numbered years. At these conferences, students and advisors from chapters throughout the region gather with alumni and staff to participate in leadership development seminars, workshops, service projects, and fellowship activities. A business meeting is held during the conference to consider regional business. Each chapter is expected to send two voting delegates to represent their chapter during this meeting.

One chapter within the region is selected by the voting delegates to host the next conference. The Regional Director and the host chapter will work together over a year to organize the conference. Typically, one or two active brothers within the host chapter will be elected by the host chapter to serve as Conference Coordinator(s). A conference committee may be utilized in order to accomplish the various tasks associated with organizing the conference. Generally 200-300 members will attend, including National Board members. Advisors are strongly encouraged to attend.

 

3. National

National Office

The National Office, located in Independence, Missouri, provides information, supplies and other resources to chapters and coordinates national educational programs such as leadership development workshops, modular workshops, service exchanges and national programs.

National Executive Director

The National Executive Director, working under the direction of the Alpha Phi Omega National President, is the chief administrative officer who handles the administration of the National Office. Responsibilities include: reporting to the National President and National Board of Directors; being an ex-officio, non-voting secretary of the National Board, its Executive Committee, and the Endowment Fund Trustees; general editor of all Fraternity publications; and keeper of the fraternity's official records, seal and minutes.

Director of Chapter Services

The Director of Chapter Services is the main point of contact for questions on the status of a chapter. Responsibilities include monitoring membership and enrollment, working with membership and extension programs, and supervising services provided by the National Office to chapters throughout the United States.

Alpha Phi Omega National Board of Directors

The Alpha Phi Omega National Board of Directors consists of the following: National President; National Vice-President; six National Program Directors; and ten Region Directors. They are elected, by voting delegates at the APO National Convention, to serve a two-year term. Ex-officio members of the board include the National Executive Director and past APO National Presidents. The National Board of Directors serves as the governing body of the fraternity between APO National Conventions. The board is responsible for overseeing various program areas and carrying out the short and long-term goals of the fraternity.

National Convention

The National Convention is the supreme authority of the fraternity. It occurs in even-numbered years during the last week of the year (between Christmas Day and New Year's Day). Recognized chapters in good standing with the national fraternity may send two voting delegates (active or chapter advisor) to the legislative session to vote on fraternity business. Voting delegates may also have the opportunity to serve on a reference committee.

The convention also provides an opportunity for members from all over the United States to participate in leadership development seminars, workshops, service projects, fellowship activities, and assist on the legislative floor. The convention is open to all members of the fraternity and is the governing body of the fraternity. Advisors are strongly encouraged to attend.

The National Convention has three purposes:

  • To enact legislation for the development and expansion of the fraternity.
  • To create fellowship, promote the exchange of ideas for service projects, and discuss chapter operations among brothers from across the United States.
  • To develop the leadership ability of the brothers in attendance, through service on committees and participation in seminars and workshops.

The National Convention conducts its legislative business by:

  • Forming reference committees of voting delegates to debate proposals within specific areas such as: amendments to the Alpha Phi Omega National Bylaws and Standard Chapter Articles of Association; suggestions for the time and place for the next National Convention; proposed revisions to long-range goals; and nominations for office.
  • Receiving reports and recommendations from reference committees.
  • Taking action resulting in adoption or rejection of proposed amendments; adoption of resolutions; selection of site and date for the next National Convention; and election of the National Board of Directors and Program Directors.


APPENDIX A

ALPHA PHI OMEGA REFERENCE MATERIALS

 

Alpha Phi Omega Terms and Acronyms

NOTE: Terms marked colloquial are unofficial and usage varies among chapters.

Active - An enrolled student at an educational institution where an APO chapter is located who has been initiated as an APO brother through the Initiation Ritual and meets all of the chapter's active membership requirements.

Advisory Committee a.k.a. Advisory Board - Committee consisting of three or more advisors from the faculty, administration or staff of the educational institution where the chapter is located; one or more scouting/youth advisors; and any other advisors deemed necessary by a chapter. Advisors are voted on by a chapter to serve on the Advisory Committee.

Alpha Big (A Big) (colloquial) - An active brother in an APO chapter who has been assigned to serve as a temporary mentor to guide a pledge through the pledging process until a permanent Big Brother is assigned to the pledge.

Alpha Phi Omega (APO) - Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity is an international coeducational service fraternity founded on the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service. APO provides its membership the opportunity to develop leadership skills as they provide service to their campus, to youth and the community, to the nation, and to members of the fraternity.

Alpha Phi Omega National E-Mail Discussion Listserve (APO-L) - A computerized E-mail distribution list that allows APO members the opportunity to make announcements about projects, conferences, and special events and to discuss or gather opinions on various issues facing the fraternity.

Alpha Phi Omega National E-Mail Social Listserve (APO-SOC) - A computerized E-mail distribution list that allows APO members the opportunity to focus on the fellowship aspect of the fraternity. Introductions are exchanged, gatherings are announced, jokes are shared, and friendships are built. This list can generate a tremendous amount of E-mail on a daily basis.

Alumni -Membership status assigned to active, advisory or honorary members who left a chapter (graduation, transferred to another educational institution, stopped taking classes, stopped serving as an advisor) without having been suspended or expelled from the chapter.

Annual Active Membership Dues (AAMD) - Dues paid by each chapter to the Alpha Phi Omega National Office by November 15 every year. The fee is a specified amount per active brother on the chapter's fall membership roster. Life members of the fraternity who are active members of a chapter must still pay these dues. Chapters who do not fulfill this requirement are not in compliance and are therefore not in good standing with the fraternity. After two years of nonpayment, the national fraternity may declare a chapter inactive.

Associate- Membership status assigned to an active brother who finds it necessary to cease full involvement with the chapter, because of other time commitments (work, school), and who petitions the chapter for associate membership.

Big Brother (Big or BB) (colloquial) - An active brother in an APO chapter who serves as a mentor to guide a pledge known as their Little Brother through the pledging process.

Board of Directors (BOD) - The Board of Directors consists of the National President, the National Vice-President, 10 Region Directors, 6 Program Directors, and Ex-Officio Members.

Brother - A member of Alpha Phi Omega who has been trained in the ideals and principles of the fraternity and participated in the Initiation Ritual.

Brotherhood - 1) A common foundation of shared beliefs, experiences and an understanding of our fraternal history and goals that is shared among all brothers of Alpha Phi Omega. 2) The collective group of people in a chapter.

Chapter Bulletin - A monthly newsletter published by the National Office that provides updates to chapters on the happenings of the fraternity.

Executive Committee a.k.a. Executive Board- Each chapter elects its own officers who comprise the Executive Committee. A typical Executive Committee includes: a President, Service Vice President, Membership Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Chair of the Advisory Committee. Other officers may include: Leadership Vice President, Fellowship Vice President a.k.a. Friendship Vice President or Social Vice President, Pledge Trainer a.k.a. Pledge Educator or Pledge Master, Sergeant-at-Arms, Historian, Recording/Corresponding Secretary, Alumni Secretary, Rush Chair, and Interchapter Liaison.

Honorary - Membership status given to a person who has contributed significantly to the ideals and purposes of Alpha Phi Omega. Honorary members have the same rights and privileges as advisory members. The chapter must approve the selection of honorary members by a three-fourths vote of the chapter's active membership. This type of membership is not given to undergraduates of schools with APO chapters.

Interest Group (IG) - A group of students interested in forming an APO chapter or reactivating an inactive chapter. The students have not completed any requirements and Alpha Phi Omega has not committed resources.

Leadership, Friendship, Service (LFS) - Common abbreviation used among brothers of the fraternity as it relates to the three cardinal principles of APO. A variation of this is YILFS, "Yours in Leadership, Friendship and Service."

Life Member - Recognition given to members who contribute to the Alpha Phi Omega Endowment Fund. Active brothers must continue to pay Annual Active Membership Dues through their chapter to the national fraternity. Life members receive a free lifetime subscription to the quarterly fraternity magazine, Torch & Trefoil (renewable at no cost every five years); a certificate; membership card; and a life member lapel pin from the National Office.

Little Brother (Little or LB) (colloquial) - A pledge in an APO chapter who has an active brother known as their Big Brother serving as mentor to guide the pledge through the pledging process.

National Convention - The National Convention is the supreme authority of the fraternity and is held in even-numbered years during the last week of the year (between Christmas Day and New Year's Day). Recognized chapters in good standing with the national fraternity may send two voting delegates (active or chapter advisor) to the legislative session to vote on fraternity business. The convention also provides an opportunity for members to participate in leadership development seminars, workshops, service projects, fellowship activities, and assist on the legislative floor.

National Service Week (NSW) - APO members are united in service, during the first full week in November, based upon a common theme chosen at the APO National Convention. Past themes have included AIDS Awareness, Environmental Awareness, Safety and Natural Disaster Preparedness, and Hunger and Homelessness.

Neophyte (colloquial) - A member of Alpha Phi Omega who has been trained in the ideals and principles of the fraternity but has not participated in the Initiation Ritual.

Newly Inducted Brother (NIB) (colloquial) - A member of Alpha Phi Omega who has participated in the Initiation Ritual within the last six months.

Petitioner - An enrolled student at an educational institution where a Petitioning Group of Alpha Phi Omega is located who is selected by the Petitioning Group to participate in the establishment of an APO chapter.

Petitioning Group (PG) - A group of students known as petitioners recognized by Alpha Phi Omega and the university who are in the process of forming an APO chapter or reactivating an inactive chapter. The petitioners are members of APO. When the requirements are completed, the petitioning group will have established a functioning chapter of APO.

Pledge - An enrolled student at an educational institution where an APO chapter is located who is selected by the chapter to participate in a 6-10 week period of preparation and training in the ideals and purposes of Alpha Phi Omega, meet the members of the chapter, and learn about chapter history and operations.

Region - Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity has divided the United States into ten regions based upon a specific geographic location. Chapters belong in a region composed of an average of 25-50 chapters.

Regional Conference - Conference held in odd-numbered years where students and advisors from chapters throughout the region gather with alumni and staff to participate in leadership development seminars, workshops, service projects, and fellowship activities. A business meeting is held during the conference to consider regional business. Each chapter is expected to send two voting delegates to represent their chapter during this meeting.

Regional Director -The region is administered by a Regional Director who has been elected by the chapters within the region for a two-year term. The Regional Director is a member of the National Board of Directors of Alpha Phi Omega, the administrative officer of the region, and has fiduciary and legal responsibility for the actions of members and chapters within the region. Responsibilities include: serving as a liaison between chapters in the region and the national fraternity; providing leadership to the region; and monitoring and communicating membership trends, problems, and concerns to the National Board of Directors.

Rush - A time period when chapters actively recruit students into the chapter with the hopes of encouraging them to become pledges. A chapter typically invites potential pledges to fellowship activities and service projects during Rush. These events give the "rushees" and the chapter an opportunity to know one another and is generally a preamble to the chapter's Pledge Program.

Section - Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity has divided the United States into sections based upon a specific geographic location. Chapters belong in a section composed of an average of 5-10 other APO chapters in the area or state. The section exists to provide chapters with the opportunity to share their experiences and to create a bond of fellowship and brotherhood beyond the chapter level.

Sectional Chair -The section is administered by a Sectional Chair who has been elected by the chapters within the section for a one-year term. The Sectional Chair oversees sectional operations and acts as a liaison between chapters and the national fraternity. Responsibilities include: helping and guiding chapters in developing their leadership, membership, fellowship and service programs; ensuring chapters are adhering to APO national policies; and coordinating a section conference, and multi-chapter leadership, membership, fellowship, and service events within the section.

Sectional Conference -A Sectional Conference is held annually. At these conferences, students and advisors from chapters throughout the section gather with alumni and staff to participate in leadership development seminars, workshops, service projects, and fellowship activities. A business meeting is held during the conference to consider section business, elect a Sectional Chair, and select a site for the next Sectional Conference. Each chapter is expected to send two voting delegates to the conference to represent their chapter during this meeting. .

Torch and Trefoil(T&T) - The primary publication of the national fraternity is published quarterly. Each chapter receives a copy for every active brother in the chapter. Life members receive a free lifetime subscription renewable at no cost every five years.


Workshops

Advisor Development Workshop (ADW) - One day training session designed for chapter advisors. Topics include: history and highlights of Alpha Phi Omega; structure, policies, and guidelines of Alpha Phi Omega; chapter operations and chapter advisors; Alpha Phi Omega Risk Management Policy; working with educational institutions; working with students; and student/advisor expectations.

Chapter Program Planning Conference (CPPC) - The entire chapter's membership (advisors, actives, associates) are encouraged to evaluate the chapter's leadership, membership, fellowship and service programs and to set goals. CPPCs may be done on a semester basis or once a year based on the needs of the chapter.

Chapter Program Workshop (CPW) - Workshop open to current and future chapter officers, staff members, and advisors from throughout the region who come together for a weekend of leadership development, idea exchange and fellowship. Topics focus on setting and achieving personal and chapter goals; chapter operations; and specific duties of officers, staff, and advisors.

Leadership Development Workshop (LDW) - Workshop open to all members of the fraternity that concentrates on developing personal skills, including communication, decision making, leadership style and use of resources. LDWs are generally held at APO conferences, although they may be held as a section or region event.


Ceremonies

Petitioning Ceremony - Ceremony for students who wish to create a chapter at an educational institution or reactivate an inactive chapter and become petitioning members of the fraternity. The groups status changes from Interest Group to Petitioning Group after this ceremony is completed. Brothers from nearby chapters and sectional/regional staff members conduct the ceremony.

Chartering Ceremony - Ceremony where an APO Board Member presents the new or reactivated chapter's charter to officials of the educational institution where the chapter will be located. This ceremony follows the Initiation Ritual of the new brothers.

Pledge Ritual (Pledge Ceremony/Induction Ceremony) - Ceremony at the beginning of the pledge period when prospective members officially become pledges.

Initiation Ritual (Brotherhood Ceremony) - Ceremony at the end of the pledge period when pledges, petitioners, advisors and honoraries become brothers of APO.

New Officers Installation Ceremony - Ceremony for actives who have been elected to serve as chapter officers. A chapter advisor should perform this ceremony.

Memorial Ceremony - Ceremony for Alpha Phi Omega members who have died to acknowledge their involvement and dedication to the principles of the fraternity.


Awards

Alumni Chapter Certificate of Appreciation - Certificate presented to an alumnus for outstanding service on a local level within or outside the fraternity. A recognized geographical or chapter alumni association makes the award.

Certificate of Appreciation - Certificate presented to individuals, organizations, or chapters deserving special recognition by a section, region or the national fraternity. The Sectional Chair, Region Director or the National Board usually makes the determination.

Chapter Certificate of Appreciation - Certificate presented to individuals or an organization deserving special recognition by a chapter for their efforts.

Chapter Distinguished Service Key (Chapter DSK) - A black service key on a light blue ribbon presented to a person who has distinguished themselves through outstanding service to their chapter. Recipients have made an outstanding and unique contribution to the chapter as a whole; exemplify and demonstrate the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service; and made a sustained contribution in a leadership role over a period of time. Chapter DSKs are voted on by the chapter and are often presented at a chapter banquet or semiformal.

Dean Arno Nowotny National Service Award - Plaque presented at National Conventions to the chapter judged to have the best overall service program. Selection is made by the Service Reference Committee in session at the National Convention based on the two-year time period between Conventions. The chapter receiving the award has conducted at least one project in each of the four service areas; participated in National Service Week and reported to the National Office; conducted at least one project related to the National Program of Emphasis; and submitted at least one Project Sharing Form to the National Service Project Exchange at the National Convention. The percentage of active participation in the chapter's service program is also considered.

Earle M. Herbert National Friendship Award - Presented at the National Convention to the chapter with the best overall membership program. Criteria for the award include: training activities, as well as fellowship activities, conducted by the chapter for the pledge and active members; chapter growth and retention; fellowship activities; pledge, alumni and advisor involvement; rush program; awards and recognition given by the chapter; attendance at interchapter events (i.e., Sectional, Regional and National Conventions); and participation in leadership and membership development program. Presentations may be written, verbal or visual.

Ellsworth P. Dobson National Certificate of Merit - Awarded to an individual or group responsible for the chartering or reactivation of a chapter.

Founders Life Membership Award - Presented to alumni who contribute one thousand dollars or more in a single sum or cumulatively to Alpha Phi Omega.

H. Roe Bartle Chapter Award - Certificate awarded to chapters which achieve and maintain high standards of effectiveness in all aspects of their programs and operations. Chapter members examines its own program through the Chapter Program Planning Conference (CPPC) and completion of the Annual Chapter Review to determine if it is deserving of the award. The review is due by November 15, the same time as the Chapter Reaffirmation Form and Active Annual Membership Dues (AAMDs).

Joseph J. Scanlon National Certificate of Merit - Awarded to chapters which: a) report 15 or more active brothers after reporting fewer than 15 the previous fiscal year; b) report a net growth of at least 5 brothers after reporting between 15 and 50 brothers the previous year; or c) report a net growth of 15% after reporting an active membership of 51 or more the previous year. Chapter membership is defined as the number of AAMD paid plus the number of initiates reported at the end of the fiscal year when compared to the prior year.

Josiah Frank Historians Award - A plaque featuring the first fraternity pin awarded at each National Convention to the chapter compiling and maintaining the best chapter history which records and perpetuates the principles and traditions of APO, covering the time since the last National Convention. Criteria include perpetuation and maintenance of chapter traditions; a visual history, such as scrapbooks; maintenance of a complete administrative history, such as minutes, project reports and treasurer's records; a written chapter history; and quality chapter newsletters going to the chapter membership including its alumni.

Local Organizational Distinguished Alumni Citation - Plaque presented to alumni, advisory or honorary members in a local organization who best exemplify the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service. Recipients should exemplify outstanding characteristics in the area of service to others. Outstanding service may be exhibited through, or to, the community, business, or educational affiliation and is not limited to Alpha Phi Omega activities. Candidates do not have to be involved in alumni activities of the fraternity. The award is made by a recognized local alumni association.

Maude Walker Young Award - Presented for exceptional service rendered to a chapter or chapters by by a non-brother spouse of an Alpha Phi Omega brother. Selection is made biennially on a regional basis. Criteria include not seeking reward or recognition for their exceptional service; contributing to the success of the service program; promoting friendship within the chapter; and encouraging greater success and achievement by the chapters.

M.R. Disborough Scouting Service Award - Given at each National Convention to chapters with exceptional service to Scouting as an integral part of their overall service program. The award acknowledges service being performed by a chapter for the Scouting movement through a continuing program or through a single outstanding project that has a lasting effect. There must be direct involvement with youth registered in any division of the Scouting Movement. The number of youth served by the chapter's program or project and the number of active members of the chapter involved with the program or project will be considered.

National Alumni Distinguished Service Key (National Alumni DSK) - A gold service key on a gold ribbon presented to alumni, honorary or advisory members who best exemplify the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service. Recipients exemplify outstanding characteristics in the area of service to others. Outstanding service may be exhibited through, or to, the community, business, or educational affiliation and is not limited to Alpha Phi Omega activities. Candidates do not have to be involved in alumni activities of the fraternity. Nominations are accepted from recognized alumni associations, active brothers, advisory, or alumni members. Selection is made by the National Alumni Committee. National Alumni DSKs are often presented at a meeting of the recipient's peers (i.e., a corporate board meeting, church service, alumni association meeting, etc.).

National Certificate of Appreciation - Given by the National Board of Directors on behalf of the National Fraternity to individuals, chapters or organizations who have made a significant contribution to the advancement of Alpha Phi Omega.

National Certificate of Recognition - Awarded to all chapters on their fifth and multiples of their fifth anniversary.

National Distinguished Service Key (National DSK) - A blue service key with diamonds on a dark blue ribbon presented to a person who has distinguished themselves through outstanding service to the National Fraternity. Recipients have made an outstanding and unique contribution to the welfare of the entire fraternity on a national basis; exemplify and demonstrate the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service; and made a sustained contribution in a leadership role over a period of time. Selection is made a committee composed of past recipients appointed by the National President and are often presented at the National Convention.

National Honorary Membership in Alpha Phi Omega - Conferred by the National Board of Directors for adherence to our fraternal ideas.

Regional Alumni Certificate of Appreciation - Presented to an alumnus for outstanding service on a sectional or regional level within or outside the fraternity. The award is made by the Regional Alumni Council.

Regional Certificate of Appreciation - Given by the Regional Director to persons or chapters deserving special regional recognition.

Regional Distinguished Alumnus Citation - Presented to alumni, advisor, or honorary member within the region who best exemplifies the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service. Recipients should exemplify outstanding characteristics in the area of service to others. Outstanding service may be exhibited through, or to, the community, business, or educational affiliation and is not limited to Alpha Phi Omega activities. Candidates do not have to be involved in alumni activities of the fraternity. Participation in fraternal or alumni activities. The award is made by the Regional Alumni Council.

Regional Distinguished Service Key (Region DSK) - A red service key on a red ribbon presented to a person who have distinguished themselves through outstanding service to their region. Recipients have made an outstanding and unique contribution to the region as a whole; exemplify and demonstrate the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service; and made a sustained contribution in a leadership role over a period of time. Region DSKs are voted on by the Region and are often presented at the Regional Conference or National Convention.

Sectional Certificate of Appreciation - Given by the Sectional Chair to persons or chapters deserving special sectional recognition.

Sectional Chair Certificate of Recognition - Awarded to Sectional Chairs on their fifth and multiples of their fifth anniversary.

Sectional Distinguished Service Key (Section DSK) - A green service key on a green ribbon presented to a brother who has distinguished themselves through outstanding service to their section. Recipients have made an outstanding and unique contribution to the section as a whole; exemplify and demonstrate the cardinal principles of leadership, friendship and service; and made a sustained contribution in a leadership role over a period of time. Section DSKs are voted on by the Section and are often presented at the Sectional Conference.


APPENDIX A

ALPHA PHI OMEGA REFERENCE MATERIALS

Section E-Mail Discussion Listserves/Web Pages

Every section in Region III has a Section E-mail discussion list and web page. The lists and web pages provide updates on upcoming events in the section (fellowship events, service projects, leadership development opportunities, conferences, etc.). The E-mail discussion list may also serve as a forum for questions individuals within the section may have for other chapters or officers. Advisors and students are strongly encouraged to subscribe to the Section E-mail discussion list.

To subscribe to the lists, send the corresponding message to the list address:

Section 79 (Western North Carolina)

SUBSCRIBE SEC79-L your name - chapter affiliation to LISTSERV@LISTSERV.VT.EDU

Section 79 Web Page: h ttp://www.trellis.net/users/apo79/apo79.htm

Section 80 (Eastern North Carolina)

SUBSCRIBE SEC80-L your name - chapter affiliation to LISTSERV@LISTSERV.VT.EDU

Section 81 (Southwestern Virginia)

SUBSCRIBE SEC81-L your name - chapter affiliation to LISTSERV@LISTSERV.VT.EDU

Section 81 Web Page: http: //www.vt.edu:10021/org/aphio/sec81/

Section 83 (Northern & Eastern Virginia)

SUBSCRIBE SEC83-L your name - chapter affiliation to MAJORDOMO@LIST.ODU.EDU

Section 83 Web Page: htt p://www.odu.edu/~src/APhiO/Section83/

Section 84 (District of Columbia and Maryland)

SUBSCRIBE SEC84-L your name - chapter affiliation to LISTSERV@LISTSERV.VT.EDU


APPENDIX A

ALPHA PHI OMEGA REFERENCE MATERIALS

Region III Web Page

http://www.odu.edu/~src/AP hiO/Region3/

Region III Advisor's Resource Guide Web Page

http://www .edtech.vt.edu/edtech/michael/apo/advisor.html

Region III Staff List

Lee Correll, Region Director
815 South 18th Street, Suite 310
Crystal City, VA 22202
Home: (703) 685-3653
Work: (301) 215-8778
Pager: (888) 754-8026
E-mail: lcorrell@capaccess.org

Kathy Murphy, Section 79 Chair
RR 1, Box 255-7
Walnut Cove, NC 27052
Home: (910) 593-2303
Work: (910) 767-2000 x2186
E-mail: katmurph@ix.netcom.com

William Turner, Section 80 Chair
3805 G Knickerbocker Pkwy.
Raleigh, NC 27612-7703
Home: (919) 782-6544
Work: (919) 515-7367
E-mail: wjturner@eos.ncsu.edu

Jamie Conover, Section 81 Chair
8493 Shady Grove Road
Mechanicsville, VA 23116
Home: (804) 746-0605
Work: (804) 378-9033
E-mail: jconover@erols.com

Diane Trafton, Section 83 Chair
3256 Tayloe Court
Herndon, VA 20171
Home: (703) 742-3875
Work: (703) 620-4100 x131
Pager: (703) 620-5521
E-mail: trafton2@capaccess.org

Linda Prevatte, Section 84 Chair
3256 Tayloe Court
Herndon, VA 20171
Home: (703) 742-3875
Work: (703) 478-0405 x34
E-mail: lprevatt@capaccess.org

John Conover, Extension Coordinator
8493 Shady Grove Road
Mechanicsville, VA 23116
Home: (804) 746-0605
E-mail: jconover@erols.com

Steven Crawford, Chapter Advisor Recruitment
  and Education (CARE) Team Leader
272 Thalia Trace Drive
Va Beach, VA 23452
Home: (757) 486-8994
Work: (757) 683-4799
E-mail: src@odu.edu

Michael Leahy, Leadership Development Coordinator
PO Box 11286
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1286
Home: (540) 951-4945
Work: (540) 231-3272
E-mail: michael.leahy@vt.edu

Mike Ogilvie, Parliamentarian
4106 Havard Street
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Home: (301) 942-0733
Work: (301) 657-8950 x55
E-mail: ogey@his.com

Judy Thompson, Alumni Coordinator
10120 Sharon Spring Drive
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Home: (540) 373-5612
Work: (540) 653-5721
E-mail: ajthomp@fls.infi.net

Cindy Turner, Service Coordinator
3805 G Knickerbocker Pkwy.
Raleigh, NC 27612-7703
Home: (919) 782-6544
E-mail: castraw@aol.com


APPENDIX A

ALPHA PHI OMEGA REFERENCE MATERIALS

 

Alpha Phi Omega National E-Mail Discussion Listserve

The fraternity established a national E-mail discussion listserve (APO-L) to allow members to make announcements about projects, conferences, and special events and to discuss or gather opinions on various issues facing the fraternity. This list is intended for discussion among chapters, petitioning groups, actives, advisors, alumni, and staff. This listserve is a forum for communication among members. For an official answer, the Sectional Chair should be contacted.

To subscribe to the list, send the following message to the following address:

SUBSCRIBE APO-L your name to LISTSERV@IUPUI.EDU

If you would like the messages on APO-L compiled into a daily digest, send the following message:

SET APO-L DIGEST to LISTSERV@IUPUI.EDU

You can stop digesting the APO-L at any time by sending the following message:

SET listname MAIL to LISTSERV@IUPUI.EDU

You may leave the list entirely by sending the following message;

SIGNOFF listname to LISTSERV@IUPUI.EDU

You may send a message to the list, by using the address:

APO-L@IUPUI.EDU

 

Alpha Phi Omega National Web Page

http://www.apo.org/

Alpha Phi Omega National Office Contact Information

14901 East 42nd Street
Independence, MO 64055-7347
Phone: (816) 373-8667
Fax: (816) 373-5975
Office Hours: 8:45am - 4:45pm (Monday - Friday)

Patrick W. Burke, C.A.E., National Executive Director APONED@AOL.COM
Judy Mitchell, Director of Chapter Services APOJUDY@AOL.COM


APPENDIX A

ALPHA PHI OMEGA REFERENCE MATERIALS

 

Advisor's Resource Guide Feedback

Thank you for taking the time to read the Advisor's Resource Guide. If you would like to refer another advisor or a student to this resource, it is available on the Advisor's Resource Guide Web Page: http://www.edtech.vt.edu/edtech/michael/apo/advisor.html

As this will always be a work in progress, any comments, questions or suggestions you have would be appreciated. Please contact the following individuals with your feedback or use the Advisors Resource Guide Web Page to post your remarks.

Lee Correll, Region III Director
815 South 18th Street, Suite 310
Crystal City, VA 22202
Home: (703) 685-3653
Work: (301) 215-8778
Pager: (888) 754-8026
E-mail: lcorrell@capaccess.org

Michael Leahy, Region III Leadership Development Coordinator
PO Box 11286
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1286
Home: (540) 951-4945
Work: (540) 231-3272
E-mail: michael.leahy@vt.edu

Linda Prevatte, Region III Leadership Development Committee
3256 Tayloe Court
Herndon, VA 20171
Home: (703) 742-3875
E-mail: lprevatt@capaccess.org